Join us for a virtual Live Talks Los Angeles event:
Tuesday, May 11, 2021
6:00pm PST/ 9pm EST 
 
 
Niall Ferguson
in conversation with Rana Foroohar

discussing his new book,  
Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe

 

This event premieres on May 11,  6pm PST/9pm EST
PURCHASE TICKETS/RSVP
 

— $40 includes a a copy of the book with a signed bookplate* 
(* we only ship to US addresses)
— Complimentary to view

 

“All disasters are in some sense man-made.” Setting the annus horribilis of 2020 in historical perspective, Niall Ferguson explains why we are getting worse, not better, at handling disasters.

Niall Ferguson is a historian and the author of sixteen books, including Civilization, The Great Degeneration, Kissinger, 1923–1968: The Idealist, and The Ascent of Money. He is the Milbank Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and the managing director of Greenmantle LLC. He is also a regular Bloomberg Opinion columnist. His many prizes include the International Emmy for Best Documentary (2009), the Benjamin Franklin Award for Public Service (2010), and the Council on Foreign Relations Arthur Ross Book Award (2016).

Rana Foroohar is Global Business Columnist and an Associate Editor at the Financial Times. She is also CNN’s global economic analyst. Her first book, “Makers and Takers: The Rise of Finance and the Fall of American Business,” was shortlisted for the Financial Times McKinsey Book of the Year award in 2016. Her second book, “Don’t Be Evil: How Big Tech Betrayed Its Founding Principles – And All of Us,”(2019), and was named Porchlight Business Book of the year. She is currently at work on her third book about the post-neoliberal world. Prior to joining the FT and CNN, Foroohar spent 6 years at TIME, as an assistant managing editor and economic columnist, and previously spent 13 years at Newsweek.

“Niall Ferguson puts the Covid pandemic into the broadest of historical perspectives, and reminds us that this was not the first time that humans have had to deal with catastrophic events.  Drawing on a deep knowledge of global history, he catalogs the threats that mankind has faced, and the resourceful ways in which human societies have dealt with them.” —Francis Fukuyama

Disasters are inherently hard to predict. Pandemics, like earthquakes, wildfires, financial crises. and wars, are not normally distributed; there is no cycle of history to help us anticipate the next catastrophe. But when disaster strikes, we ought to be better prepared than the Romans were when Vesuvius erupted, or medieval Italians when the Black Death struck. We have science on our side, after all.

Yet in 2020 the responses of many developed countries, including the United States, to a new virus from China were badly bungled. Why? Why did only a few Asian countries learn the right lessons from SARS and MERS? While populist leaders certainly performed poorly in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, Niall Ferguson argues that more profound pathologies were at work–pathologies already visible in our responses to earlier disasters.

In books going back nearly twenty years, including Colossus, The Great Degeneration, and The Square and the Tower, Ferguson has studied the foibles of modern America, from imperial hubris to bureaucratic sclerosis and online fragmentation.

Drawing from multiple disciplines, including economics, cliodynamics, and network science, Doom offers not just a history but a general theory of disasters, showing why our ever more bureaucratic and complex systems are getting worse at handing them.

Doom is the lesson of history that this country–indeed the West as a whole–urgently needs to learn, if we want to handle the next crisis better, and to avoid the ultimate doom of irreversible decline.

 

Join us for a virtual Live Talks Los Angeles event:
Tuesday, May 4, 2021
6:00pm PDT/ 9pm EDT 
 
 
Senator Elizabeth Warren
in conversation with Amber Tamblyn

discussing her book,  “Persist”

This event premieres on May 4,  6pm PST/9pm EST
 
TICKETS:
$38 includes a signed copy of the book*
(includes shipping to US orders only)

 

The inspiring, influential senator and bestselling author mixes vivid personal stories with a passionate plea for political transformation.

Elizabeth Warren, the widely admired former presidential candidate, is the senior senator from Massachusetts. She is the author of eleven previous books, including A Fighting Chance and This Fight Is Our Fight, both of which were national bestsellers. The mother of two and grandmother of three, she lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with her husband, Bruce Mann, and their beloved dog, Bailey.
 
Amber Tamblyn is an Emmy, Golden Globe  and Independent Spirit Award nominated actress, writer, and director, and the author of six books including  the critically acclaimed, “Era of Ignition: coming of age in a time of rage and revolution.” She’s a contributing writer for The New York Times, Poet in Residence at Amy Poehler’s Smart Girl’s, poetry reviewer for Bust Magazine, and a founding member of the Times Up Organization. 
Elizabeth Warren is a beacon for everyone who believes that real change can improve the lives of all Americans. Committed, fearless, and famously persistent, she brings her best game to every battle she wages.

In Persist, Warren writes about six perspectives that have influenced her life and advocacy. She’s a mother who learned from wrenching personal experience why child care is so essential. She’s a teacher who has known since grade school the value of a good and affordable education. She’s a planner who understands that every complex problem requires a comprehensive response. She’s a fighter who discovered the hard way that nobody gives up power willingly. She’s a learner who thinks, listens, and works to fight racism in America. And she’s a woman who has proven over and over that women are just as capable as men.

Candid and compelling, Persist is both a deeply personal book and a powerful call to action. Elizabeth Warren―one of our nation’s most visionary leaders―will inspire everyone to believe that if we’re willing to fight for it, profound change is well within our reach.

Join us for a virtual Live Talks Los Angeles event:
Monday, May 3, 2021
6:00pm PST/ 9pm EST 
 
 
An Evening with
Julianna Margulies*

discussing her memoir,  
Sunshine Girl: An Unexpected Life

*interviewer to be announced

This event premieres on May 3,  6pm PST/9pm EST
 
TICKETS:
$38 includes a signed copy of the book* (US orders only)
* includes signed book plate. Books ship week of May 10.

 

Known for her outstanding performances on the groundbreaking television series The Good Wife and ER, Julianna Margulies deftly chronicles her life and her work in this deeply powerful memoir.

Julianna Margulies, an Emmy, Golden Globe, and Screen Actors Guild award winner,  has achieved success in television, theater, and film. Margulies starred as Alicia Florrick on the long-running hit CBS show The Good Wife, which she also produced, and is also well known for her role as one of the original cast members of ER. More recently, Margulies has starred on critically acclaimed series including The Morning Show, Billions, and The Hot Zone. She has been involved with Project ALS and Erin’s Law and is also a board member of the New York City–based MCC Theater company. She resides in New York City with her husband and son.  
 
“Sunshine Girl is at once a tender coming-of-age story and a deeply personal look at a young woman making sense of the world against a chaotic and peripatetic childhood. We are all so fortunate that Julianna Margulies discovered her passion. You will feel inspired by the way she has lived her life: with grit, grace, and gratitude.”—Katie Couric
 
As an apple-cheeked bubbly child, Julianna was bestowed with the family nickname “Sunshine Girl.” Shuttled back and forth between her divorced parents, often on different continents, she quickly learned how to be of value to her eccentric mother and her absent father. Raised in fairly unconventional ways in various homes in Paris, England, New York, and New Hampshire, Julianna found that her role among the surrounding turmoil and uncertainty was to comfort those around her, seeking organization among the disorder, making her way in the world as a young adult and eventually an award-winning actress.
 
Throughout, there were complicated relationships, difficult choices, and overwhelming rejections. But there were also the moments where fate, faith, and talent aligned, leading to the unforgettable roles of a lifetime, both professionally and personally—moments when chaos had finally turned to calm.
 
Filled with intimate stories and revelatory moments, Sunshine Girl is at once unflinchingly honest and perceptive. It is a riveting self-portrait of a woman whose resilience in the face of turmoil will leave readers intrigued and inspired.
Join us for a virtual Live Talks Los Angeles event:
Thursday, April 29, 2021
6:00pm PDT/ 9pm EDT 
 
 
Senator Amy Klobuchar
in conversation with Preet Bharara

discussing her book,  
“Antitrust: Taking on Monopoly Power from the Gilded Age to the Digital Age”

This event premieres on April 29,  6pm PST/9pm EST
 
TICKETS:
$39 includes a signed copy of the book* (US orders only)

 

An important, urgently needed book from the senior senator from Minnesota, and former candidate for president of the United States–a fascinating exploration of antitrust in America and the way forward to protect all Americans from the dangers of curtailed competition, and from vast information gathering, through monopolies.

Amy Klobuchar is the senior senator from Minnesota, the first woman from that state to be elected to the U.S. Senate. She is the ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Competition Policy, and Consumer Rights. She was born in Plymouth, Minnesota, and graduated from Yale University and the University of Chicago Law School. She lives in Minneapolis, MN.
 
Preet Bharara served as U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York from 2009 to 2017. Bharara oversaw the investigation and litigation of all criminal and civil cases and supervised an office of over 200 Assistant U.S. Attorneys, who handled cases involving terrorism, narcotics and arms trafficking, financial and healthcare fraud, cybercrime, public corruption, organized crime, and civil rights violations. The New York Times dubbed Bharara one of “the nation’s most aggressive and outspoken prosecutors.” In 2017, Bharara joined the NYU School of Law faculty as a Distinguished Scholar in Residence. He is the co-founder of CAFE Studios and the host of CAFE’s Stay Tuned with Preet, a podcast focused on issues of justice and fairness. Bharara graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College and from Columbia Law School, where he was a member of the law review.  He is the author of a top five New York Times bestselling book, “Doing Justice: A Prosecutor’s Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law.”

From Standard Oil, and the Sherman Anti-Trust Act, to the Progressive Era’s trust-busters, Amy Klobuchar, in this large, compelling history, writes of the fight against monopolies in America.

She writes of the breakup of Ma Bell, the pricing monopoly of Big Pharma, and the future of the giant tech companies (Facebook, Amazon, Google).

She begins with the Gilded Age (1870s-1900), when builders of fortunes and rapacious robber barons such as J. P. Morgan, John Rockefeller, and Cornelius Vanderbilt were reaping vast fortunes as industrialization swept across the American landscape, with the rich getting vastly richer and the poor, poorer. She discusses President Theodore Roosevelt, who, during the Progressive Era (1890s-1920), “busted” the trusts (breaking up monopolies); the Clayton Act of 1914; the Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914; and the Celler-Kefauver Act of 1950 (it strengthened the Clayton Act). She explores today’s Big Pharma and its price-gouging; and tech, television, content, and agriculture communities and how a marketplace with few players, or one in which one company dominates distribution, can hurt consumer prices and stifle innovation.

As the ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Competition Policy, and Consumer Rights, Klobuchar is at work on, among others, issues raised by giant tech companies, such as Facebook, Google (it reportedly controls 90 percent of the search engine market), and Amazon, and puts forth her plans, ideas, and legislative proposals designed to strengthen the antitrust laws and antitrust enforcement.

Join us for a virtual Live Talks Los Angeles event:
Sunday, April 25, 2021
3:00pm PT/ 6pm ET 


Malcolm Gladwell
in conversation with Walter Isaacson

discussing his book,
“The Bomber Mafia: A Dream,
a Temptation, and the Longest Night of the Second World War“

 

This event premieres on April 25 at 3pm PT/6pm ET

 

Tickets: $36
includes the audio book
(Tickets open to international orders. Your audio book will be e-delivered on pub day, April 27)

PURCHASE TICKET/AUIDIO BOOK

 

Malcolm Gladwell’s exploration of how technology and best intentions collide in the heat of war.

Malcolm Gladwell is the author of six New York Times bestsellers including Talking to StrangersDavid and GoliathOutliersBlink, and The Tipping Point. He is the cofounder and president of Pushkin Industries, an audiobook and podcast production company which produces the podcasts Revisionist History; Broken Record, a music interview show; and Solvable, in which Gladwell interviews innovative thinkers with solutions to some of the world’s biggest problems.  The Bomber Mafia began as episodes Revisionist History, and the production team behind that show also produced the audiobook edition. Gladwell appeared at Live Talks Los Angeles for Talking to Strangers (video) and David and Goliath, and previously also interviewed Michael Lewis (video) on our stage.

Walter Isaacson, a professor of history at Tulane, has been CEO of the Aspen Institute, chair of CNN, and editor of Time. He is the author of The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race; Leonardo da VinciThe Innovators; Steve JobsEinstein: His Life and UniverseBenjamin Franklin: An American Life; and Kissinger: A Biography, and the coauthor of The Wise Men: Six Friends and the World They Made.  He previously appeared at Live Talks Los Angeles in conversation with Michael Lewis for his book on da Vinci (video). 

In The Bomber Mafia: A Dream, a Temptation, and the Longest Night of the Second World War, Malcolm Gladwell  weaves together the stories of a Dutch genius and his homemade computer, a band of brothers in central Alabama, a British psychopath, and pyromaniacal chemists at Harvard to examine one of the greatest moral challenges in modern American history.

Most military thinkers in the years leading up to World War II saw the airplane as an afterthought. But a small band of idealistic strategists had a different view. This “Bomber Mafia” asked:  What if precision bombing could, just by taking out critical choke points — industrial or transportation hubs – cripple the enemy and make war far less lethal? 

In Revisionist History, Gladwell re-examines moments from the past and asks whether we got it right the first time. In The Bomber Mafia, he steps back from the bombing of Tokyo, the deadliest night of the war, and asks, “Was it worth it?”  The attack was the brainchild of General Curtis LeMay, whose brutal pragmatism and scorched-earth tactics in Japan cost thousands of civilian lives but may have spared more by averting a planned US invasion.

Things might have gone differently had LeMay’s predecessor, General Haywood Hansell, remained in charge.  As a key member of the Bomber Mafia, Haywood’s theories of precision bombing had been foiled by bad weather, enemy jet fighters, and human error. When he and Curtis LeMay squared off for a leadership handover in the jungles of Guam, LeMay emerged victorious, leading to the darkest night of World War II.

The Bomber Mafia is a riveting tale of persistence, innovation, and the incalculable wages of war.

 

 

Join us for a virtual Live Talks Los Angeles event:
Thursday, April 22, 2021
6:00pm PST/ 9pm EST 
 
Irv Yalom
in conversation with Lori Gottlieb


discussing his book,  
“A Matter of Death and Life”

 

This event premieres on April 22 at 6pm PST/9pm EST

PURCHASE TICKETS/RSVP

 

TICKETS:
— $32 includes a a copy of the book with a signed bookplate* 
(* we only ship to US addresses)
— Complimentary to view

 

A year-long journey by the renowned psychiatrist and his writer wife after her terminal diagnosis, as they reflect on how to love and live without regret.

Irvin D. Yalom, MD is professor emeritus of psychiatry at the Stanford University School of Medicine and his most recent book is A Matter of Death and Life, a memoir co-authored with his wife, esteemed feminist author Marilyn Yalom, after her cancer diagnosis. As a mental health professional, Irv has devoted his career to counseling those suffering from anxiety and grief. Even though his professional life has always influenced his published works, never have the two intersected as directly and personally as in A Matter of Death and Life, with its alternating accounts of their last months together and Irv’s first months alone. His books are in nearly 30 languages and millions of copies have been sold worldwide. They include: When Nietzsche Wept (winner of the 1993 Commonwealth Club gold medal for fiction); Love’s Executioner, a memoir; Becoming Myself, a group therapy novel; and his classic textbooks Inpatient Group Psychotherapy  and Existential Psychotherapy, which have trained generations of therapists. He lives in Palo Alto, California.  

Lori Gottlieb is a psychotherapist and author of the New York Times bestseller Maybe You Should Talk to Someone, which has sold over a million copies and is currently being adapted as a television series. In addition to her clinical practice, she writes The Atlantic’s weekly “Dear Therapist” advice column and is co-host of the popular “Dear Therapists” podcast produced by Katie Couric. She a frequent expert in the media and has appeared on The Today Show, Good Morning America, CBS This Morning, CNN, and NPR’s Fresh Air and her recent TED Talk was one of the Top 10 Most Watched of the Year. Visit her website.  

“This beautiful, poignant, and uplifting memoir is a love story, a tale of two incredibly accomplished lives that were lived almost as one, the sum turning out to be so much greater than its parts. It will inspire you and perhaps move you to look differently at your life―it did that for me.” — Abraham Verghese ― author of Cutting for Stone

Internationally acclaimed psychiatrist and author Irvin Yalom devoted his career to counseling those suffering from anxiety and grief. But never had he faced the need to counsel himself until his wife, esteemed feminist author Marilyn Yalom, was diagnosed with cancer. In A Matter of Death and Life, Marilyn and Irv share how they took on profound new struggles: Marilyn to die a good death, Irv to live on without her.

In alternating accounts of their last months together and Irv’s first months alone, they offer us a rare window into facing mortality and coping with the loss of one’s beloved. The Yaloms had numerous blessings―a loving family, a Palo Alto home under a magnificent valley oak, a large circle of friends, avid readers around the world, and a long, fulfilling marriage―but they faced death as we all do. With the wisdom of those who have thought deeply, and the familiar warmth of teenage sweethearts who’ve grown up together, they investigate universal questions of intimacy, love, and grief.

Informed by two lifetimes of experience, A Matter of Death and Life is an openhearted offering to anyone seeking support, solace, and a meaningful life.