Thursday, September 27, 2012
8:00pm (Reception 6:30-7:30pm)

An Evening with T.C. Boyle
discussing his new novel, San Miguel

Track 16 at Bergamot Station
2525 Michican Avenue, Bldg. C-1
Santa Monica, CA

PURCHASE TICKETS

$20, $40 includes Boyle’s book,
$34 signed book purchase only (shipping included to US destinations)
$95 includes the book + pre-event reception 

The inimitable and acclaimed writer returns to Live Talks LA with his newest and fourteenth novel, San Miguel 

See a book trailer for T.C. Boyle’s San Miguel.

Boyle’s latest, San Miguel is a soaring historical narrative about two families trying to start new lives on a windswept, near-desolate island just off the coast of southern California.  Publishers Weekly says, “Boyle’s epic saga of struggle, loss, and resilience tackles Pacific pioneer history with literary verve….”

Hear the prolific Boyle read from and discuss this latest book, along with his writing process, and his thoughts on living the literary life.

“Each day,” he says, “I try to enter another world and stay there until my mind gets fuzzy and I have to quit work till the next day.  In the interim, whether I’m sitting miles out in the Sierras with a book , doing yard work, cooking dinner or pouring a glass of wine, the artistic questions and choices of the story or novel stay with me until I can sit down again at the computer the following morning and move forward.”

 PURCHASE TICKETS

* Proceeds from tickets to the reception support the upcoming Live Talks Los Angeles emerging voices/authors series of events that commence in 2013.

$20, $40 includes Boyle’s book,
$95 includes pre-event reception (6:00-7:00pm) plus book

 

Fun interview with T.C. Boyle in the Speakeasy column in the Wall Street Journal.  T.C. Boyle joins at Live Talks Los Angeles at Track 16 in Santa Monica this Thursday, March 3. Hope to see you there…Here’s an excerpt:

What made you want to write a historical novel with such a similar setting?

I’m trying a realistic novel because I haven’t done it before. I just don’t want to bore myself and, by extension, my readers, by repeating myself. Readers get very passionate about one book or story or mode, and they’re always on my Web page saying why don’t you write more stories like  “Descent of Man”? And I’m saying, if I did nobody would be reading them, because we would have both shot ourselves from boredom. The artists whom I most admire are constantly stretching themselves and doing different things. Like the late John Updike. He wrote in many modes.

Read the full interview here…

The Los Angeles Times has a review of T.C. Boyle’s new book by  Richard Rayner. An excerpt…

Mudslides, earthquakes, floods, fires — nothing quite gets T.C. Boyle’s juices going like a natural disaster putting his characters through the wringer. His new novel, “When the Killing’s Done,” opens with an action set piece that is unusually fraught and tense even by the author’s nearly apocalyptic standard…..This novel, his 12th, like a previous one, “The Tortilla Curtain,” is based on real events and conflicts. That’s to say, rats did populate Anacapa as described here, and the National Parks Service did provoke a brouhaha after dropping rat poison on the island in 2001. Boyle is, in this respect, a traditional, even old-fashioned writer, determined, as Dickens was, to entertain and bring the news. His jazzy, slangy, iridescent style could scarcely be more of the moment….whether flexing his muscles in the delirious sprints that are his short stories, or in the intricately plotted and sometimes slightly schematic marathons of novels like this one; he writes lyrically, beautifully — about the ocean, the land, about California history and its pitfalls and perils…… Boyle makes us laugh and wonder at his dazzling gifts but his comedy is a dark business.

And here’s the video short.  T. C. Boyle reads at Live Talks Los Angeles on March 3 at Track 16.  Get your tickets here.

Here’s a review of When the Killing’s Done in the New York Review of Books.  An excerpt…

T. Coraghessan Boyle’s new When the Killing’s Done falls in nicely with the mood of Margaret Atwood’s vatic sci-fi tales or Jonathan Franzen’s recent, naturalistic Freedom with its impassioned defense of birds. Though he’s been writing for a long time about America’s problems, Boyle usually does so more covertly, in a comic voice with comedy’s concealed agenda. Here, though, there’s the note of the preacher in despair that has surfaced sometimes in past novels, notably The Tortilla Curtain (1995), his admired book about illegal Hispanic immigrants in L.A.’s Topanga Canyon.

T.C. Boyle will read from When the Killing’s Done at Track 16 on March 3. Join us.