Monday, June 5, 2017
8pm 
 
Scott Turow
in conversation with Paul Levine
 
discussing the writing life and his upcoming novel,
Testimony


Ann and Jerry Moss Theatre
New Roads School

Herb Alpert Educational Village
3131 Olympic Boulevard
Santa Monica, CA 90404

PURCHASE TICKETS 
$42 Reserved Section seat + a copy of Testomony
$20 General Admission Seat
$95 Reception (6:30-7:30pm) + Reserved Section Seat 
        + copy of Testimony

Scott Turow is the author of ten bestselling works of fiction, including Identical, Innocent, Presumed Innocent, and The Burden of Proof, and two nonfiction books, including One L, about his experience as a law student. His books have been translated into more than forty languages, sold more than thirty million copies worldwide, and have been adapted into movies and television projects. He has frequently contributed essays and op-ed pieces to publications such as the New York Times, Washington Post, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, and The Atlantic.

Testimony is Scott Turow’s most ambitious and complex work-which takes us from the gritty familiarity of his beloved Kindle County into a mysterious world of international intrigue. It’s the best kind of thriller, which stimulates the mind as well as thrilling the heart.”
Jeffrey Toobin, author of American Heiress

“Scott Turow’s new novel is the dedicated fiction-reader’s version of El Dorado: a driving, unputdownable courtroom drama/murder mystery that is also a literary treasure, written in language that sparkles with clarity and resonates with honest character insight. I came away feeling amazed and fulfilled, as we only do when we read novelists at the height of their powers. Put this one on your don’t-miss list.”
(Praise for Innocent)―Stephen King

At the age of fifty, former prosecutor Bill ten Boom has walked out on everything he thought was important to him: his law career, his wife, Kindle County, even his country. Still, when he is tapped by the International Criminal Court–an organization charged with prosecuting crimes against humanity–he feels drawn to what will become the most elusive case of his career. Over ten years ago, in the apocalyptic chaos following the Bosnian war, an entire Roma refugee camp vanished. Now for the first time, a witness has stepped forward: Ferko Rincic claims that armed men marched the camp’s Gypsy residents to a cave in the middle of the night–and then with a hand grenade set off an avalanche, burying 400 people alive. Only Ferko survived.

Boom’s task is to examine Ferko’s claims and determinine who might have massacred the Roma. His investigation takes him from the International Criminal Court’s base in Holland to the cities and villages of Bosnia and secret meetings in Washington, DC, as Boom sorts through a host of suspects, ranging from Serb paramilitaries, to organized crime gangs, to the US government itself, while also maneuvering among the alliances and treacheries of those connected to the case: Layton Merriwell, a disgraced US major general desperate to salvage his reputation; Sergeant Major Atilla Doby,a vital cog in American military operations near the camp at the time of the Roma’s disappearance; Laza Kajevic, the brutal former leader of the Bosnian Serbs; Esma Czarni, Ferko’s alluring barrister; and of course, Ferko himself, on whose testimony the entire case rests-and who may know more than he’s telling.

Paul Levine is the author of the “Jake Lassiter” and “Solomon vs. Lord” series of legal thrillers. He has won the John D. MacDonald Florida Fiction Award and was nominated for the Edgar, Macavity, International Thriller, Shamus, and James Thurber prizes. He wrote 20 episodes of the military drama JAG on CBS and co-created the Supreme Court drama First Monday starring James Garner and JoeMantegna. His newest novel is Bum Luck, described by Bookreporter as “a one-sit, must-read novel full of memorable characters and unforgettable vignettes.”

Friday, June 22, 2012

An Evening with The Rock Bottom Remainders
a concert featuring Stephen King, Amy Tan, Dave Barry, Scott Turow,
Mitch Albom, Matt Groening, James McBride, Roy Blount, Jr.,
Ridley Pearson, Greg Iles & Sam Barry

with special guest, Roger McGuinn of The Byrds

The El Rey Theatre, 5515 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90036

6:30-7:30 pm — Reception
8:30 pm — Concert (doors open at 7:30 pm)

PURCHASE TICKETS
$40 — Concert (doors open at 7:30 pm)
$200 — Concert + Pre-reception (6:30-7:30 pm)
$295 — Concert + Reception + signed lithograph by the band (illustration at left by David Horsey)
*$150 — Signed lithograph (includes shipping)
*$300 — Signed books by all participating band members (includes shipping)
* These ticket options do not include concert tickets. Orders will be shipped after the concert. 

At Live Talks Los Angeles, we typically feature conversations, but we are excited to be producing a concert featuring some luminaries of the literary world.  The Rock Bottom Remainders — the all author rock band — will perform at the El-Rey Theatre, June 22.  Roger McGuinn of the Byrds, whom we featured in conversation in November 2011, joins as musical guest.

Marking the band’s 20th anniversary, the band has decided its 20 year run will mark the end and will host their final public concert at the El Rey  Theatre on Friday, June 22. The show is part of the band’s final two city concert tour –The Past Our Bedtime Tour.

Confirmed for the concert are Stephen King, who hasn’t performed with  the band since 2007; Amy Tan, Dave Barry, Mitch Albom, Scott Turow, Matt Groening, James McBride, Greg Iles, Ridley Pearson, Roy Blount, Jr,  and Sam Barry.  The band dedicates these two concerts to founder Kathi Goldmark, who passed away on May 24th after a courageous battle with cancer.

On the upcoming concert Stephen King, who plays rhythm guitar says, “A few years ago, Bruce Springsteen told us we weren’t bad, but not to try to get any better otherwise we’d just be another lousy band. After 20 years, we still meet his stringent requirements. For instance, while we all know what ‘stringent’ means, none of us have yet mastered an F chord.”
King adds, “I’m looking forward to reuniting with all my bandmates. We’re older but not dead. Some of us can remember all of the words; all of us can remember some of the words; but NONE of us can remember all of the music. That’s why they call it rock and roll.”

Dave Barry, co-lead guitarist, chimes in, “It’s not that we had a ‘creative  differences’ issue, or some in the band wanted to launch solo music careers, but the fact is that we can no longer play an entire set without aving to pee.” Barry adds, “We realize the Rolling stones are celebrating 50 years this year, but we don’t want to reach the point where our stage  moves involve motorized scooters.”

Since the band’s founding in Anaheim in 1992 — at a book convention — they have strictly performed to support causes, and have raised over $2 Million for various literacy causes. Proceeds from the El Rey show will benefit the Los Angeles Downtown Women’s Center, the Midnight Mission and the launch of an Emerging Author Series at Live Talks Los Angeles.

Are Apple Inc. (AAPL) and the big trade publishers colluding to manipulate the market in electronic books?

No, says Scott Turow, president of the Authors Guild.  We host him at Live Talks Business on June 22nd for breakfast to discuss this and other challenges in the world of book publishing. He’ll be in conversation with Carolyn Kellogg of the Los Angeles Times’ Jacket Copy blog about all things books.

Scott Turow observes this from two perches: As the writer of bestsellers, including Presumed Innocent, Innocent, One L, and Ultimate Punishment.  And, as the current president of The Authors Guild, the leading advocate for writers’ interests.

Here’s an excerpt from an Op-Ed piece in Bloomberg this week on the issue by Turow…

The Justice Department has been investigating whether the publishers colluded in adopting, for the sale of e-books, the same “agency model” pioneered by Apple in selling iTunes. Under that setup, Apple acts as the publishers’ sales agent, taking a cut (usually 30 percent) and leaving it to publishers to set the prices of the e-books they publish.

I have no way of knowing whether the publishers colluded. My friends in publishing insist that price was never part of the discussions, but the Justice Department prosecutors seem to think they have a compelling case. All I can say as an author — and as president of the Authors Guild, the nation’s largest membership organization of professional book writers — is that if the government wants to intervene in the literary marketplace, I hope it will consider the complex ecology of bookselling in the U.S.