Tuesday, September 19, 2017
8pm 
 
Gretchen Rubin
in conversation with Daniel Siegel
 
discussing her upcoming book,
The Four Tendencies: The Indispensable Personality Profiles That Reveal How to Make Your Life Better (and Other People’s Lives Better, Too)


Ann and Jerry Moss Theatre

New Roads School

Herb Alpert Educational Village
3131 Olympic Boulevard
Santa Monica, CA 90404

PURCHASE TICKETS
$40  General Admission Seat + book
$50  Reserved Section Seat +book
$20  General Admission Seat (on sale August 18)

Gretchen Rubin is the author of several books, including the New York Times bestsellers, Better Than BeforeThe Happiness Project and Happier at Home. A member of Oprah’s SuperSoul 100, her books have sold more than two million copies worldwide, in more than thirty-five languages, and on her popular daily blog, she reports on her adventures in pursuit of habits and happiness. She also has a an award-winning podcast, Happier with Gretchen Rubin. Rubin started her career in law, and was a clerk for Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. She last appeared at Live Talks Los Angeles in March 2015. Watch the video.

During her multibook investigation into understanding human nature, Gretchen Rubin realized that by asking the seemingly dry question, “How do I respond to expectations?” we gain explosive self-knowledge. She discovered that based on their answer, people fit into four categories: Upholders, Questioners, Obligers, and Rebels. Understanding our own particular tendency allows us to make better decisions, meet deadlines, suffer less stress, and engage more effectively.

How do you respond to expectations?  What is your tendency?
Take the quiz.

More than 600,000 people have taken her online quiz, and managers, doctors, teachers, spouses, and parents already use the framework to help people make significant, lasting change.  
 
With sharp insight, compelling research, and hilarious examples, Rubin’s The Four Tendencies can help you be happier, healthier, more productive, and more creative.  

Dr. Daniel J. Siegel is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, where he also helped to establish the Mindful Awareness Research Center.  He also heads up the Mindsight Institute, an educational center devoted to promoting insight, compassion, and empathy in individuals, families, institutions, and communities. Dr. Siegel’s books include three New York Times bestsellers: Brainstorm, and, with Tina Payne Bryson, Ph.D, The Whole-Brain Child and No-Drama Discipline. As a lecturer, he’s spoken before King of Thailand, Pope John Paul II, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, at Google University, and TEDx.  He appeared at Live Talks Los Angeles for his book, Mind: A Journey to the Heart of Being Human (Sep. 2016) Watch the video.  More recently, he interviewed Jack Kornfield for Kornfield’s book, No Time Like the Present: Finding Freedom, Love, and Joy Right Where You Are. (Jun. 2017) Watch the video.

Thursday, March 19, 2015
8:00pm (Reception 6:30-7:30pm)

Gretchen Rubin
in conversation with Lisa Napoli

Better Than Before: 
Mastering the Habits of Our Everyday Lives

William Turner Gallery
Bergamot Station Arts Center
2525 Michigan Avenue,
Santa Monica, CA 90404

SOLD OUT. VIDEO WILL BE POSTED SOON.
$20 General Admission
$30 Reserved Seats
$43 Includes Rubin’s book + Seats in reserved section
$95 Includes pre-event reception + Rubin’s book + Reserved Seats
 

Gretchen Rubin is a thought-provoking and influential writer on the linked subjects of habits, happiness, and human nature. She’s the author of several books, including the New York Times bestsellers, Happier at Home and The Happiness Project. Her books have sold more than two million copies worldwide, in more than thirty languages, and on her popular daily blog, she reports on her adventures in pursuit of habits and happiness. Rubin started her career in law, and was clerking for Justice Sandra Day O’Connor when she realized she wanted to be a writer. 

In her upcoming book, Better Than Before, Gretchen Rubin  tackles the critical question: How do we change? Her answer: through habits. Habits are the invisible architecture of everyday life. It takes work to make a habit, but once that habit is set, we can harness the energy of habits to build happier, stronger, more productive lives.
 
So if habits are a key to change, then what we really need to know is: How do we change our habits?
 
Better than Before answers that question. It presents a practical, concrete framework to allow readers to understand their habits—and to change them for good. Infused with Rubin’s compelling voice, rigorous research, and easy humor, and packed with vivid stories of lives transformed, Better than Beforeexplains the (sometimes counter-intuitive) core principles of habit formation. 
 
Along the way, Rubin uses herself as guinea pig, tests her theories on family and friends, and answers readers’ most pressing questions—oddly, questions that other writers and researchers tend to ignore: 

• Why do I find it tough to create a habit for something I love to do? 
• Sometimes I can change a habit overnight, and sometimes I can’t change a habit, no matter how hard I try. Why? 
• How quickly can I change a habit? 
• What can I do to make sure I stick to a new habit? 
• How can I help someone else change a habit? 
• Why can I keep habits that benefit others, but can’t make habits that are just for me? 

As Better Than Before makes clear, and as we all know from practical experience, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. To change our habits, we must first figure out ourselves. Some people do better when they start small; others, when they start big. Some thrive with occasional breaks from good habits, while others do better when they never break the chain. When we choose the strategies that work best for us, going to the gym can be as automatic as putting on a seatbelt. Filing expense reports or passing up that piece of chocolate cake won’t drain us. With a foundation of good habits, we can build a life that reflects our values and goals.

Lisa Napoli is a career journalist who has worked at The New York Times, CNN, MSNBC, and now covers arts and culture for KCRW.  She’s the author of the book, Radio Shangri-La, about her time in and around the kingdom of Bhutan, where she went to start a radio station at the dawn of democratic rule.  She’s currently at work on a biography of the late philanthropist, Joan Kroc.  She is the proud recipient of the 2014 Halo Award from the Deutsch Family Foundation for a monthly volunteer cooking group she leads at the Downtown Women’s Center on Skid Row.